Treatment with potassium bicarbonate lowers calcium excretion and bone resorption in older men and women

Title:
Treatment with potassium bicarbonate lowers calcium excretion and bone resorption in older men and women
Creator:
Dawson-Hughes, Bess (Author)
Harris, Susan S. (Author)
Palermo, Nancy J. (Author)
Castaneda-Sceppa, Carmen (Author)
Rasmussen, Helen M. (Author)
Dallal, Gerard E. (Author)
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Endocrine Society
Copyright date:
2009
Type of resource:
Text
Genre:
Articles
Format:
electronic
Digital origin:
born digital
Abstract/Description:

Context: Bicarbonate has been implicated in bone health in older subjects on acid-producing diets in short-term studies.

Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of potassium bicarbonate and its components on changes in bone resorption and calcium excretion over 3 months in older men and women.

Design, Participants, and Intervention: In this double-blind, controlled trial, 171 men and women age 50 and older were randomized to receive placebo or 67.5 mmol/d of potassium bicarbonate, sodium bicarbonate, or potassium chloride for 3 months. All subjects received calcium (600 mg of calcium as triphosphate) and 525 IU of vitamin D3 daily.

Main Outcome Measures: Twenty-four-hour urinary N-telopeptide and calcium were measured at entry and after 3 months. Changes in these measures were compared across treatment groups in the 162 participants included in the analyses.

Results: Bicarbonate affected the study outcomes, whereas potassium did not; the two bicarbonate groups and the two no bicarbonate groups were therefore combined. Subjects taking bicarbonate had significant reductions in urinary N-telopeptide and calcium excretion, when compared with subjects taking no bicarbonate (both before and after adjustment for baseline laboratory value, sex, and changes in urinary sodium and potassium; P = 0.001 for both, adjusted). Potassium supplementation did not significantly affect N-telopeptide or calcium excretion.

Conclusions: Bicarbonate, but not potassium, had a favorable effect on bone resorption and calcium excretion. This suggests that increasing the alkali content of the diet may attenuate bone loss in healthy older adults.

Comments:
Originally published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism v.94 no.1 (January 1, 2009), pp. 96-102. DOI:10.1210/jc.2008-1662
Subjects and keywords:
Potassium - Physiological effect
Bone resorption
Calcium in the body
potassium bicarbonate
calcium excretion
bone resorption
quantitative study
Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism

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